Amine vs Amide- Definition, 11 Major Differences, Examples

Amines vs Amides

Amine Definition Amines are derivates of ammonia where one or more hydrogen atoms bonded to the nitrogen atom are replaced by a substituent like and alkyl or aryl group to form organic compounds. Amines are important organic compounds as these form amino acids and proteins, which are basic building blocks of living systems. Inorganic derivatives … Read more

Aldoses vs Ketoses- Definition, 7 Major Differences, Examples

Aldoses vs Ketoses

Aldoses Definition An aldose is a monosaccharide consisting of a carbon backbone and a carbonyl group at carbon-1, resulting in an aldehyde group. The general formula of aldoses is the same as most carbohydrates, Cn(H2O)n. The carbon atoms in the carbon backbone are each bonded to a hydroxyl group. All aldoses exhibit stereoisomerism as they … Read more

Aromatic vs Aliphatic Compounds- Definition, 15 Key Differences, Examples

Aromatic Compounds vs Aliphatic Compounds

Aromatic Compounds Aromatic compounds are compounds that belong to a large class of unsaturated chemical compounds that are defined by the presence of one or more planar rings of atoms linked together by covalent bonds. The stability of aromatic compounds is referred to as the aromaticity of the compounds as a result of the delocalization … Read more

Amylose vs Amylopectin- Definition and 12 Major Differences

Amylose vs Amylopectin

Amylose Definition Amylose is a polysaccharide consisting of α-D-glucose units that are linked together by α(1→4) glycosidic bonds. An amylose is an essential form of resistant starch that is more resistant to digestion than other starch molecules.  The tightly packed helical structure of the molecule aids in its resistance. The carbon atoms in glucose are … Read more

Aldehyde vs Ketone- Definition, 14 Key Differences, Examples

Aldehyde vs Ketone

Aldehyde Definition An aldehyde is a type of organic compound containing the functional group with the structure –CHO, where the carbon double-bonded to oxygen is termed the carbonyl group. Aldehydes are generally formed by the removal of a hydrogen atom from an alcohol compound. The chemical formula of aldehyde is R-CHO where the carbon atom … Read more